Sketching Section Views  
 

 

Chuck Jaw Problem for Sketching a Pictorial Section View.

Three views of the chuck jaw fixture are shown. The objective of the problem is to make a 3-D pictorial of the object showing a full section across the model from left to right.




Steps for Sketching a Pictorial Section View of the Chuck Jaw.

(A) The sketch starts with a light construction box that will enclose the object. The cutting plane line is also located across the box. (B) The outer visible edges of the object are then sketched using the box outline as a guide for positioning these lines. (C) Next, the visible outline along the sectioned surface is sketched. (D) Internal details that lay on the surface of the cut section, like the counterbore holes, are now added. (E) Visible internal details that fall behind the cut surface can be sketched in. (F) Finally, the cut surface is identified by cross-hatching to complete the sectioned pictorial of the chuck jaw.




Collet Fixture Problem for Sketching a Pictorial Section View.

Three Views of a collet fixture are shown. The objective of the problem is to make a 3-D pictorial of the object showing a are shown. The objective of the problem is to make a 3-D pictorial of the object showing a half section view of the object.




Conventional Representation of Mechanical
Elements in Section Views.

(A) The sketch starts with a light box that will enclose the object and a cutting plane line that isolates the appropriate one-quarter of the object which is to be removed. (B) The visible edges of the top cylindrical surface of the collet fixture are sketched as a starting point, and outlines of the cut surfaces are lightly constructed. (C) The visible outlines along the sectioned surfaces and some of the visible details on the right side of the object are sketched. (D) Visible details of the left side of the object are sketched. (E) Internal details that lay on the surface of the cut section, like the small through pin hole, are now added. In addition, the remaining visible details of the object are added. (F) Finally, the cut surfaces are identified by cross-hatching and the small fillets are sketched for the intersection of the upright cylinder with the base.




The Problem for the Valve Housing Full Section View Sketch.

The valve housing is shown with a top orthographic view, a right side view, and a wireframe pictorial. The objective here is to complete a sketch of the front view that would show a full section of the object.




Sketching the Full Section View of the Valve Housing.

(A) The sketch starts by boxing the overall front view outline of the object by orthographically projecting edges from the top and side views. (B) The internal features of the object are now projected and the outline of the full section profile is obtained. (C) The sectioned surface is now identified by cross-hatch lines. (D) Finally, the centerlines for the through holes are sketched, and the cutting plane is identified in the top view to indicate a full section of the object.




The Problem for the Rod Base Half Section View Sketch.

A top, right side, and wireframe pictorial of the rod base is given, and the problem objective is to complete the front view as a half section.




Foreshortened Features in Section Views.

(A) The solution begins by projecting the overall outline of the front view. This includes the visible edges, the top edge of the circular base, and the middle vertical edge associated with the half section cut line. (B) Next, the interior edges of the object are projected, including the through holes.
(C) The sectioned surface of the half section is now identified with cross-hatch lines. (D) Finally, the centerlines are sketched for the through holes, and the cutting plane is added to the top view. The left side of the front view is shown here with hidden lines omitted.


 

   
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College of Engineering at UT Austin